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From the Founder & VP Products at CloudSwitch

Ellen Rubin

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Top Stories by Ellen Rubin

This post is part of a series examining the issues involved when moving applications between internal data centers and public clouds. The true challenges in storage and data management in the cloud result from the diverse and often unfamiliar processes and infrastructures offered by the cloud providers, including: new provisioning methods, storage properties, data population and transfer, and systems for data management (snapshots, clones, replication, backup). The cloud providers define the relationship between servers and storage and often impose constraints on everything from allocation size limits to the ways in which storage is managed. These are just some of the things you’ll want to consider as you start to think about integrating cloud computing into your existing IT environments. I’d like to focus in detail on the complexity and variability of cloud provisi... (more)

Moving to the Cloud: What's Really Required

When we started talking with a wide range of IT managers and companies in early 2008, we quickly encountered a fascinating dichotomy – Cloud Computing is really easy / Cloud Computing is really hard.  What made this so interesting is that the casual users were saying cloud computing was easy and the hard-core users were claiming that it was hard.  Amazon and a number of other cloud providers have made major advancements since this time, but the “it’s easy / it’s hard” split still exists. Today, if you want to use the cloud and deploy a server, it is really quite easy to “build” ... (more)

Moving to the Cloud: Managing Your Environment

Cloudonomics Journal This post is part of a series examining the issues involved when moving applications between internal data centers and public clouds. One of the advantages of cloud computing is that someone else is managing the infrastructure – including the servers, network devices and storage systems, not to mention the data center power conditioning, cooling and fire suppression equipment.  One of the costs of offloading this infrastructure is that the cloud becomes something different and separate from your data center.  In most deployments today, the cloud is almost com... (more)

2010 is the Year of the Federated Cloud Computing

In this first post of 2010, I’d like to look at one of the most important cloud issues that enterprises want to tackle: federation in the cloud — across clouds and between the cloud and the data center. Also known as hybrid clouds, the notion of federation has been around since cloud computing began, but as a long-term vision rather than a working solution. This year that gap is going to close. What Is Cloud Federation? Federation brings together different cloud flavors and internal resources so companies can select a computing environment on demand that makes sense for a partic... (more)

True Isolation Makes the Public Cloud Work Like a Private Cloud

Security is always mentioned as a key factor limiting cloud adoption, but what does “security” really mean in the cloud? To understand the potential risks of cloud computing—and how to address them—we need to be more specific. Once we’ve accurately defined the problems, we can address them with the right technology and processes. When you get into specifics with CSOs and risk managers, security concerns in the cloud can essentially be boiled down to two main issues: It’s a shared environment: In a multi-tenant public cloud, you’re sharing resources—servers, cloud networks, and sto... (more)